INFORMATION ON INDIVIDUAL SESSIONS

DCMI COMMUNITY AND TASK GROUP MEETINGS

The DCMI Community and Task Group meetings will address issues related to the charter of that particular group.  For further information about a group, please follow the links to the group's Web area, Wiki and mailing list.  Further information about the sessions will be published on the mailing lists.  


Libraries Task group
Wednesday 20 October, 9.00am-5.00pm
Wiki: http://dublincore.org/librarieswiki/
Mailing list: http://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/DC-LIBRARIES.html


Preservation Community
Wednesday 20 October, 9.00am-10.30am
Web: http://dublincore.org/groups/preservation/
Mailing list: http://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/dc-preservation.html


Registry Community and Task Group
Wednesday 20 October, 9.00am-12.30pm
Meeting Agenda: http://wiki.metadataregistry.org/DCMI_Registry_Community
Web: http://dublincore.org/groups/registry/
Wiki: http://wiki.metadataregistry.org/DCMI_Registry_Community#DCMI_Registry_Community_Projects
Mailing list: http://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/DC-REGISTRY.html


Metadata Provenance Task Group
Wednesday 20 October, 1:30pm-5.00pm

Meeting Agenda: http://wiki.bib.uni-mannheim.de/dc-provenance/doku.php?id=agenda
Web: http://www.dublincore.org/groups/provenance/
Wiki: http://wiki.bib.uni-mannheim.de/dc-provenance/doku.php
Mailing list: http://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/DC-PROVENANCE.html

Education Community and Task Group
Wednesday 20 October, 1.30pm-5.00pm
Meeting Agenda: http://dublincore.org/educationwiki/Community_20Meeting_20Agenda
Web: http://dublincore.org/groups/education/
Wiki: http://dublincore.org/educationwiki/
Mailing list: http://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/DC-EDUCATION.html


DCMI/NKOS Task Group
Thursday 21 October, 2.00pm-5.30pm
Web: http://dublincore.org/groups/nkos/
Wiki: http://www.metadataetc.org/wiki/dcmi-nkos/doku.php
Mailing list: http://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/DC-NKOS.html


User Documentation and Glossary Task Group
Thursday 21 October, 2.00pm-3.30pm
Wiki: http://sites.google.com/site/dublincoreglossaryupdate/
Mailing list: http://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/DC-GLOSSARY.html


Libraries Community
Thursday 21 October, 4.00pm-5.30pm
Web: http://dublincore.org/groups/libraries/
Mailing list: http://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/DC-LIBRARIES.html


Science and Metadata Community
Thursday 21 October, 4.00pm-5.30pm
Web: http://dublincore.org/groups/sam/
Mailing list: http://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/DC-SCIENCE.html


Knowledge Management Community
Friday 22 October, 2.00pm-3.30pm
Web: http://dublincore.org/groups/km/
Mailing list: http://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/DC-KM.html


DCMI/RDA Task Group 
Friday 22 October, 2.00pm-3.30pm
Meeting Agenda: http://dublincore.org/dcmirdataskgroup/DC_2d2010_20Meeting
Wiki: http://dublincore.org/dcmirdataskgroup/
Mailing list: http://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/DC-RDA.html


Tools Community 
Friday 22 October, 2.00pm-3.30pm
Web: http://dublincore.org/groups/tools/
Mailing list: http://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/DC-TOOLS.html


Social Tagging Community
Friday 22 October, 4.00pm-5.30pm
Web: http://dublincore.org/groups/social-tagging/
Wiki: http://dublincore.org/taggingwiki/
Mailing list: http://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/DC-SOCIAL-TAGGING.html


Localization and Internationalization Community and Translation Task Group
Friday 22 October, 4.00pm-5.30pm
Meeting Agenda: http://eiah.org/dcwiki/index.php/DCMI_L%26I_Community:Current_events
Web: http://dublincore.org/groups/languages/
Wiki: http://eiah.org/dcwiki/index.php/Translation_Task_Force
Mailing list: http://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/DC-INTERNATIONAL.html
 


TUTORIAL SESSIONS


Title: History, Key Concepts, and Evolving Context
Convenor: Jane Greenberg and Jon Phipps
Date/Time: Wednesday 20 October, 9:00am-12:30pm
Abstract: This tutorial will address the history and foundation of the Dublin Core; the growth of the DCMI as an organization and a community of practice; and the evolution of the Dublin Core's architectural framework. Part one will review basic metadata concepts, Dublin Core semantics, and common renderings. Part two will present concepts informing the Dublin Core Abstract Model and introduce formal syntaxes for encodings integrating with the Semantic Web and linked data.


Title: A SAFARI from the Dublin Core to the Semantic Web
Convenor: Karen Coyle and Ron Daniel
Date/Time: Wednesday 20 October, 1:30pm-5:00pm
Abstract: The Semantic Web is crossing the chasm between the innovative focus of pioneers and early adopters to the pragmatic focus of early mainstream adopters. In this talk, Karen Coyle and Ron Daniel will cover a six-step roadmap to go from typical data practices to having content which fully participates in the Semantic Web. SAFARI is a mnemonic to remember those steps.


SPECIAL SESSIONS


Title: DCMI Membership session
Convenors: TBA
Date/Time: Wednesday 20 October, 11.00am-12.30pm
Web: http://dublincore.org/about/members/
Abstract: This session will outline the characteristics and benefits of the DCMI Membership program with presentations outlining the approaches and perspectives of current DCMI Members. Participants in this session can discuss how their country or organization could participate in the Membership program to support DCMI.


Title: Dublin Core in the UK
Convenor: Rosemary Russell
Date/Time: Thursday 21 October, 2.00pm-2:45pm
Abstract: Session 1 will be a discussion of existing domain models for libraries and cultural heritage institutions. The session will aim to define areas that need to be modeled, identify types of things that are described within these areas, and assess the usefulness of existing models such as ISBD, CIDOC-CRM, and the FRBR Family of models. This session will outline work in progress at UKOLN which aims to provide an impression of Dublin Core use in the UK via a set of selected worked examples including short descriptions. A blog is being used for dissemination. The workshop will seek feedback on approach and content, as well as comparison with use elsewhere.


Title: Linked Data 1: Domain Models
Convenors: Karen Coyle and Corey Harper
Date/Time: Thursday 21 October, 2.00pm-3:30pm
Abstract: Session 1 will be a discussion of existing domain models for libraries and cultural heritage institutions. The session will aim to define areas that need to be modeled, identify types of things that are described within these areas, and assess the usefulness of existing models such as ISBD, CIDOC-CRM, and the FRBR Family of models. 

Title: ISO Metadata for Learning Resources (MLR)
Convenors: TBA
Date/Time: Thursday 21 October, 2.45pm-3.30pm
Abstract: ISO/IEC JTC1 SC 36 (that deals with standards for technology in education) has developed a metadata framework that, as best it can, implements DCMI terms and rules for all relevant educational metadata. This new standard will be described and questions answered by one of the editors.  


Title: Linked Data 2: Vocabulary Selection & Development
Convenors: Karen Coyle and Corey Harper
Date/Time: Thursday 21 October, 4.00pm-5.30pm
Abstract: Session 2 will survey vocabularies of properties and classes available for describing the types of resources identified in session 1. Discussion will be focused on determining appropriateness of available vocabularies, identifying gaps that may require new vocabularies, and looking at properties for expressing equivalence between resources and between resource descriptions. 


Title: Application Profiles for Linked Data: Models & Requirements (Parts 1 & 2)
Convenors: Tom Baker, Emmanuelle Bermès, & Antoine Isaac
Sponsors: DCMI Architecture Forum and W3C Library Linked Data Incubator Group
Meeting Agenda: http://www.w3.org/2001/sw/wiki/JointMeeting2010
Date/Time: Friday 22 October, 2:00-5:30pm
Abstract: Application Profiles for Linked Data: models and requirements"
This two-part meeting will look at current approaches to application profiles -- methods for documenting the content of descriptive metadata to promote the design of compatible metadata applications and maximize the coherence of metadata in a Linked Data environment. Starting with a review of the approach based on the DCMI Abstract Model, including the Description Set Profile constraint language and Singapore Framework for Dublin Core Application Profiles, the meeting will also consider other emerging approaches to specifying and documenting metadata patterns for use in Linked Data. By taking a fresh look at requirements in a rapidly evolving environment, this meeting aims at identifying and prioritizing areas where future work may be needed.


Title: Linked Data 3: Breakout Sessions & Follow-up
Convenors: Karen Coyle & Corey Harper
Date/Time: Friday 22 October, 4.00pm-5.30pm
Abstract: Session 3 will take the strands from previous sessions and begin discussion of a road-map for linked data in the library and cultural heritage domains. Outcomes should include identifying problems with easy solutions, identifying more difficult challenges for the community, and identifying areas where implementation efforts should be focused near-term. This session may also include follow-up from the Architecture Forum session on the future of the DC Abstract Model and DSP Constraints Language.


PAPERS & PROJECT REPORTS


Paper Title: Building blocks of metadata: What can we learn from Lego™?
Authors: Emma Tonkin & Andrew Hewson
Date/Time: Thursday 21 October, 9:45am-10:45am
Abstract: The idea that metadata, particularly Dublin Core, could be usable as a Lego™-like construction kit has been a popular suggestion for over a decade. In this paper, we first explore what this metaphor originally meant – why the idea is so appealing, and what design lessons we might take from the idea. We take a look at how close we are today to that ideal, looking at examples of real-world metadata design projects, and suggest that at present the situation is often more analogous to a game of Tetris – that is, the construction kit is sometimes limited, time concerns are often an issue, and there is limited opportunity for creativity. We explore patterns of collaboration in existing projects, such as the Scholarly Works Application Profile development. Finally, we ask how what we know about the process of building a shared understanding and formalisation about a domain can help us come closer to the ideal of Dublin Core as an approachable puzzle-game or construction kit.


Paper Title: Visualizing Metadata for Environmental Datasets
Author: Sherry Koshman
Date/Time: Thursday 21 October, 9:45am-10:45am
Abstract: Data growth in the environmental sciences has resulted in multidimensional datasets that are heterogeneous and extensive. Scientific academic research includes scalar, sensor, or vector data, which may be publically available. The datasets generated extend to local environmental groups whose trained citizens contribute to the surveillance of local habitats and ecological conditions that can potentially enhance various data analyses on a national and international level. While the abundance of environmental data is growing, tools to select, compare, and utilize the growing number of datasets generated from multiple institutions and groups are not keeping pace. This paper focuses on planning the construction of a dataset visualization that concentrates on the use of metadata to facilitate the identification, selection, and comparison of dataset information. It is presented in the visualization framework at the School of Information Sciences called VIBE (Visual Information Browsing Environment) and plans to adapt the Dublin Core Metadata Element Set as a basis for its development. In the long term, visualization may emerge not only as a primary tool for modeling environmental scientific metadata, but also as a mechanism used at the incipience of environmental scientific discovery.


Paper Title: FRBR: A generalized approach to Dublin Core Application Profiles
Authors: Maja Zumer, Marcia Lei Zeng, & Athena Salaba
Date/Time: Thursday 21 October, 11:15am-12:30pm
Abstract: According to the Singapore Framework, any development of a Dublin Core Application Profile (DCAP) has to include the creation of a domain model. DC Scholarly Works Application Profile (SWAP) was the first one explicitly using Functional Requirements for Bibliographic Records (FRBR) model in creating its domain model. FRBR has recently been extended with Functional Requirements for Authority Data (FRAD) and Functional Requirement for Subject Authority Data (FRSAD) thus forming the so-called FRBR family. This paper first further develops the SWAP domain model to incorporate the FRBR family models. Then a generalized FRBR-family-based DCAP domain model is presented to be used as the basis for specific domain application profiles.


Paper Title: Enhancing interoperability of FRBR-based metadata
Athor: Jenn Riley
Date/Time: Thursday 21 October, 11:15am-12:30pm
Abstract The Variations/FRBR project at Indiana University is experimenting with implementing the Functional Requirements for Bibliographic Records (FRBR) conceptual model in order to further research on next-generation library catalogs and promote the re-usability and interoperability of FRBR-based metadata. This paper describes the use of FRBR in some system implementations, discusses the first steps our project has taken to promote shared FRBRized data, and raises some issues related to representing FRBRized data in Dublin Core Application Profiles.


Paper Title: Moving library metadata toward Linked Data: Opportunities provided by the eXtensible Catalog
Author: Jennifer B. Bowen
Date/Time: Thursday 21 October, 11:15am-12:30pm
Abstract: To ensure that they can participate in the Semantic Web, libraries need to prepare their legacy metadata for use as linked data. eXtensible Catalog (XC) software facilitates converting legacy library data into linked data using a platform that enables risk-free experimentation and that can be used to address problems with legacy metadata using batch services. The eXtensible Catalog also provides “lessons learned” regarding the conversion of legacy data to linked data by demonstrating what MARC metadata elements can be transformed to linked data, and helping to suggest priorities for the cleanup and enrichment of legacy data. Converting legacy metadata to linked data will require a team of experts, including MARC-based catalogers, specialists in other metadata schemas, software developers, and Semantic Web experts to design and test normalization/conversion algorithms, develop new schemas, and prepare individual records for automated conversion. Library software applications that do not depend upon linked data may currently have little incentive to enable its use. However, given recent advances in registering legacy library vocabularies, converting national library catalogs to linked data, and the availability of open source software such as XC to convert legacy data to linked data, libraries may soon find it difficult to justify continuing to create metadata that is not linked data compliant. The library community can now begin to propose smart practices for using linked data, and can encourage library system developers to implement linked data. XC is demonstrating that implementing linked data, and converting legacy library data to linked data, are indeed achievable.


Project Report Title Building metadata application framework for Chinese digital library: A case study of National Digital Library of China
Authors: Yunyun Shen, Long Xiao, & Ying Feng
Date/Time: Thursday 21 October, 2:00pm-3:30pm
Abstract: This paper reports a project named “General Rules of National Digital Library Metadata”, trying to build a metadata application framework for National Library of China (NLC). It aims at solving the applications of DC in Chinese digital library, developing a series of related standards, criteria and platform, to meet the requirements of describing, organizing, managing, serving and preserving the Chinese digital objects. It functions to support producing, processing, organizing, releasing, preserving and managing information resources in the digital library system of NLC, and then to achieve the interoperability and data sharing with other digital library systems to the more extent. The project outcomes are two parts: a metadata application framework and principles of National Digital Library of China based on the work of DCMI and the other international leading metadata projects, and a conversion program. According to this project, we are trying to find the best practice of metadata application for developing digital library in China.


Project Report Title: Use of community metadata: Public policy research in PolicyArchive
Author: Sarah Buchanan
Date/Time: Thursday 21 October, 2:00pm-3:30pm
Abstract: PolicyArchive collects public policy research from over 700 known research publishers and makes these documents accessible in a navigable digital library. The contributions of thousands of publications from these providers enable in-depth secondary source materials to be utilized by policymakers, legislators, foundations, scholars, journalists, and educators. The functionality of this digital repository is discussed, including the use of terminologies, subject navigability, and Special Collections. PolicyArchive presents unique content with structured metadata which is openly accessible; the application of these principles not only provides coordinated access to previously unavailable resources, but also allows the reader to place a given document in multiple contexts. Analysis of this information environment illuminates ongoing digital library initiatives regarding the creation of navigable, accessible learning resources.


Project Report Title: Creating metadata best practices for CONTENTdm users
Author: Myung-Ja K. Han, Sheila Bair, & Jason Lee
Date/Time: Thursday 21 October, 2:00pm-3:30pm
Abstract: The OCLC CONTENTdm Metadata Working Group was formed in response to research demonstrating the need for guidelines and best practices for creating quality Dublin Core metadata, which is useful to the primary user community, but also “shareable” outside of the local context. The CONTENTdm Metadata Working Group has worked since August 2009 in a test environment to identify best practices for creating Dublin Core metadata in CONTENTdm and mapping to MARC for sharing in WorldCat.org via the WorldCat Digital Collection Gateway, a self-service OAI harvesting tool. The first best practices document identified 12 core metadata fields and four recommended fields “as appropriate,” and provides guidelines for field content standardization and mapping. Concerns such as adherence to the Dublin Core one-to-one principle and the recording of original and digital dates and publishers are discussed, along with recommendations for configuring metadata for the Digital Collection Gateway, which was developed to increase the shareability of metadata.


Project Report Title: The Case for Implementing Core Descriptive Embedded Metadata at the Smithsonian
Authors: Stephanie Ogeneski Christensen, & Douglas Donald Dunlop
Date/Time: Thursday 21 October, 4:00pm-5:30pm
Abstract The current mandate to digitize all collections at the Smithsonian Institution along with the increasing need to share data and increase access to collections has made it essential to establish institutional metadata standards, including those for embedding metadata. This paper documents the ongoing process of establishing core embedded metadata within the institution through the work of the Smithsonian Embedded Metadata Group, which is pan-institutional in nature and includes museums, libraries, archives, and research institutes. The focus of the working group described within this paper is the creation of core embedded metadata fields for use in still images.


Project Report Title: The Question about Questions: Is DC a Good Choice to Address the Challenges of Representation of Clinical Research Questions and Value Sets?
Authors: James E. Andrews, Denise Shereff, Timothy Patrick, & Rachel Richesson
Date/Time: Thursday 21 October, 4:00pm-5:30pm
Abstact: Question and answer sets are the core of clinical research. The [RD] PRISM (Patient Registry Item Specifications and Metadata for Rare Disease) project will provide a library of standardized questions across a broad spectrum of rare diseases that can be used for developing new registries and revising existing ones. Questions will be encoded using well-established clinical terminologies to enable cross-indication and cross-disease analyses, facilitate collaboration, and generate meaningful results for rare disease patients, physicians, and researchers. Encoded question and answer sets will also be indexed to facilitate information retrieval by subject matter, data type, and time interval. This project will outline issues and challenges related to indexing questions for future use and for data sharing; to explore possible metadata and terminological standards for indexing them; and, determine if Dublin Core (DC) is a viable alternative to be explored in a library of standardized rare disease research questions.


Project Report Title: Metadata for WICRI, a Network of Semantic Wikis for Communities in Research and Innovation
Authors: Jacques Ducloy, Thierry Daunois, Muriel Foulonneau, Alice Hermann, Jean-Charles Lamirel, Stéphane Sire, Jean-Pierre Thomesse, & Christine Vanoirbeek
Date/Time: Thursday 21 October, 4:00pm-5:30pm
Abstract: This paper introduces metadata issues in the framework of the WICRI project, a network of semantic wikis for communities in research and innovation. A wiki can be related to an institution, to a research field (mainly, environment or ICT at this time), or to a regional entity. Metadata and semantic items play the strategic role to handle the quality and the consistency of the network. An important point deals with the “wiki way of working” in which a metadata specialist and a scientist, familiar with abstract formalisms, can work altogether, at the same time, on the same pages. Some first experiments of designing metadata are presented. A wiki, encyclopedia of metadata, is proposed, and related technical issues are discussed.


Paper Title: Celebrating 10 years of government of Canada metadata standards
Authors: Marie-Claude Côté, Margaret Devey, Lynne McAvoy, & Leigh Bain
Date/Time: Friday 22 October, 9:45am-11:00am
Abstract As the Dublin Core Metadata Initiative celebrates its 15th anniversary, the Government of Canada (GC) celebrates its 10th year of making information easier to find. The Government of Canada officially adopted the Dublin Core as its core metadata standard for Web resource discovery in 2001. Soon the Government of Canada started to develop domain-specific metadata beyond Web and resource discovery to meet wider information needs. Supported by standards and other policy instruments, rapid metadata developments were made in the areas of records management, Web content management, e-learning, executive correspondence and geospatial data. The Government of Canada has been an active participant in the DC-Government Working Group, and organized its own event, the Canadian Metadata Forum in 2003 and 2005. More recently, the Government of Canada has adopted an enterprise information architecture (EIA) approach to metadata, within a larger information management strategy. The Government of Canada now has plans underway to develop other metadata domains, registries and repositories, its own namespace facility, and a vast awareness campaign to brand metadata as the “DNA of Government”.


Paper Title: Extending RSS to meet Central Bank needs
Authors: Paul Asman, San Cannon, & Christine Sommo
Date/Time: Friday 22 October, 9:45am-11:00am
Abstract: The Federal Reserve wanted to use RSS to represent not only news, such as press releases, but also data, such as exchange rates. The Fed hoped to use one set of feeds to accommodate two different audiences for RSS, human readers (at one remove) and self-contained automated processes. While the different RSS specifications provide elements for traditional news items, they require extensions to handle data. Since central banks all tend to report the same sorts of information, the Fed joined with other central banks to create an extended specification that met their needs. This specification extends RSS 1.0, which is the more readily extended RSS specification. The extension uses elements from established metadata standards wherever it can, such as for language and audience, and adds elements when subjects are not found in those standards or are more particular to central banks, such as (monetary) currency. Although the central banks intend these new elements to be used primarily by machine processes, the element names have sufficient semantic transparency so that they can be understood by human readers.


Paper Title: Linking Entities in Scientific Metadata
Authors: Jian Qin, Miao Chen, Xiaozhong Liu, & Andrea Kathleen Wiggins
Date/Time: Friday 22 October, 9:45am-11:00am
Abstract: Linked entity data in metadata records builds a foundation for semantic web. Even though metadata records contain rich entity data, there is no linking between associated entities such as persons, datasets, projects, publications, or organizations. We conducted a small experiment using the dataset collection from the Hubbard Brook Ecosystem Study (HBES), in which we converted the entities and their relationships into RDF triples and linked the URIs contained in RDF triples to the corresponding entities in the Ecological Metadata Language (EML) records. Through the transformation program written in XML Stylesheet Language (XSL), we turned a plain EML record display into an interlinked semantic web of ecological datasets. The experiment suggests a methodological feasibility in incorporating linked entity data into metadata records. The paper also argues for the need of changing the scientific as well as general metadata paradigm.


Paper Title: From Records to Streams: Merging Library and Publisher Metadata
Authors: Carol Jean Godby
Date/Time: Friday 22 October, 11:30am-1:00pm
Abstract: This article announces the availability of a crosswalk between ONIX 2.1 and MARC 21 developed by OCLC and illustrates how it is used in the OCLC Metadata for Publishers project. To accomplish the goal of merging library and publisher metadata and anticipating the need to mine MARC records for other purposes, the design of the crosswalk, the corresponding software, and the application take records apart and process the fields individually, creating data streams that match the intended use of the ONIX standard and resemble the pre-Internet paradigm of Electronic Data Interchange, or EDI, for describing materials and tracking them through a supply chain. Though this design works well enough to support commercial-grade processes, problems arise with mappings between physical descriptions in the two standards, which need to be more rigorously modeled or closely aligned. Nevertheless, the RDA/ONIX Framework, which is reviewed here, promises to reduce this obstacle.


Paper Title: The One-To-One Principle: Challenges in current practice
Author: Steven J. Miller
Date/Time: Friday 22 October, 11:30am-1:00pm
Abstract: The DCMI One-to-One Principle holds that related but conceptually different entities, such as a photograph and a digital image of that photograph, should be represented by separate metadata records. In practice, however, large numbers of practitioners do not adhere to this principle and commonly mix elements representing two related entities in a single metadata record. This paper explores reasons why this is the case, why it is problematic, how the principle itself would benefit from greater clarity, some practical options for maintaining the principle in current systems, with advantages and disadvantages of each. The paper focuses on the widespread application context of small to medium-sized cultural heritage institutions digitizing unique local resources, creating metadata using digital collection software packages such as CONTENTdm, and exposing only simple Dublin Core metadata for OAI harvesting and aggregating.


Paper Title: Better guidelines, better functionality: How metadata supports the cycle of system improvement at UNT
Author: Hannah Tarver
Date/Time: Friday 22 October, 11:30am-1:00pm
Abstract: The University of North Texas (UNT) Libraries recently revised their Metadata Input Guidelines in order to improve usability and accessibility for metadata writers, and to enhance the quality of metadata that drives new features in their digital systems. This paper describes important considerations in the revision process and also demonstrates the relationship between quality metadata and system functionality that ultimately benefits both metadata creators and system end-users.


POSTERS


Poster Title: The Public library catalogue as a social space: Transaction log analysis of user interaction with social discovery systems.
Authors: Louise Spiteri
Abstract: The specific goal of this project is to examine and compare how library users access, use, and interact with two social discovery systems used in two Canadian public library systems. Transaction log analysis will be conducted to answer the following research questions: a)How do public library users interact with social discovery systems? Specifically, which enhanced catalogue features do they use, e.g., faceted navigation, user-contributed content such as tagging, reviews, and ratings, sorting features, etc., and with which frequency? b)How does usage between the two social discovery systems compare? Specifically, are there commonalities or differences between how public library users use different social discovery systems? and c)Does the use of social discovery systems change over time? Specifically, is the use of the features in social discovery systems consistent over time?


Poster Title: Vocabulary and Taxonomy Issues When Searching Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) Health Literature
Presenter: Mary Jo Dorsey & Ellen Detlefsen
Abstract: Objective: To describe the gaps in existing vocabularies and taxonomies that are used to retrieve literature on health issues for LGBT adolescents in order to build a working ontology of appropriate terms. Methods: A formal literature search on healthcare concerns of LGBT adolescents was done, using indices to the literature of the health sciences, the social and psycho-social sciences, and the information sciences. No terms from standard subject heading lists and controlled vocabularies such as MeSH®, the Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms®, the ERIC Thesaurus®, and the MedlinePlus® Consumer Vocabulary, exist that adequately describe this literature, making precise retrieval difficult. A search using keywords and text words yielded 80 articles, and a careful reading of the articles prompted this effort to develop an ontology of “gay-sensitive” terms from the consumer informatics perspective. Results: A first-step model of LGBT terms, derived from the published research literature, is presented, which offers a more appropriate set of terms to use when searching the multi-disciplinary literature that reports current research on health concerns of LGBT adolescents. If an ontology can be developed, tested, and described for this topic, it will add to the sparse literature on consumer terminology for informatics applications.


Poster Title: Towards a Premodern Manuscript Application Profile
Presenters: Sheila Bair & Susan Steuer
Abstract: Individuals who wish to develop digital scholarly works and libraries that wish to provide access to their precious and fragile holdings have an interest in digitizing premodern manuscripts. These handmade objects are often beautiful and each one is unique. Involvement in the International Congress on Medieval Studies at Kalamazoo, Michigan has made it clear to librarians at WMU that both smaller institutions (which may hold only one or two items) and individual scholars wish to provide appropriate metadata for digitized manuscripts, but do not have the combination of technical and subject skills needed. Even with a good description of material from a bookseller or printed catalog, those unfamiliar with metadata schema and language may find it daunting, while libraries may lack a specialist in the terminology and skills of paleography and codicology. In addition, most existing large digital collections use TEI, which has a steep learning curve. The goal of this project is to develop a standardized and user-friendly Dublin Core application profile which uses elements from the European Networking Resources and Information Concerning Cultural Heritage (ENRICH) Specification and Dublin Core to create a metadata profile which works well with the long-standing conventions of premodern manuscript descriptive codicology and paleography. Inclusion of defined ENRICH elements in the profile provides a “fill-in-the-blank” template informing non-specialists of descriptive metadata useful to medieval scholars.


Poster Title: Universal Access to Cultural Heritage Material: The Europeana Resolution Discovery Service for Persistent Identifiers
Presenter: Lars G. Svensson
Abstract: Within the cultural heritage community, it is increasingly common to distinguish the tasks of identification and addressing the object by using a location-independent Persistent Identifier (PI) such as a URN, a DOI, or a Handle linked to a URL describing the object location in an institutional repository or a digital long-term preservation system run by a national library. This way, the problem that a digital object is inaccessible if the content provider moves it to a different location can be solved since the object can still be found using the PI. In order to resolve a PI to a URL with the object location, a resolution service is required, which usually is run by the national library acting as legal deposit for the digital object. This requires the user to know, which national library is responsible for the service, which is a problem for digital library portals collecting metadata from content providers in different cultural settings and from different nations. For the European cultural heritage portal Europeana, it was decided to implement a metaresolver – The Europeana Resolution Discovery Service (ERDS) – which collects all PI resolution requests and dispatches them to the proper national resolver service. The development of this metaresolver is part of the Europeana sister-project EuropeanaConnect and is scheduled for completion in July 2010.


Poster Title: Bridging End Users’ Terms and AGROVOC Concept Server Vocabularies
Presenter: Ahsan Morshed, Gudrun Johannsen, Johannes Keizer, & Marcia Lei Zeng
Abstract: AGROVOC is one of the most important resources for covering the terminology of all subjects to interest the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) (including agriculture, forestry, fisheries, food and related domains). AGROVOC is currently being converted from a traditional term-based knowledge organization system (KOS) to a concept-based system, the AGROVOC Concept Server (CS). The CS allows the representation of more semantics such as specific relationships between concepts as well as relationships between their multilingual lexicalizations. Its functions include being a resource to help structure and standardize agricultural terminology in multiple languages for use by any number of different users and systems around the world. An enabling tool, the AGROVOC Concept Server Workbench (ACSW), has been developed by FAO in collaboration with Kasetsart University in Thailand and other partners. It supports the maintenance of the CS data in a distributed environment. One of the goals of the project is to set up a network of international experts who can share the collaborative maintenance and extension of the AGROVOC CS, and thus enhance the creation of agricultural knowledge much more efficiently. The ACSW is part of the larger Agricultural Ontology Service (AOS) initiative and the first major step towards an "Ontology Service", which aims to provide semantic-based services to users in the agricultural domain. To cover all agricultural related information, ACSW needs integrated vocabularies.


Poster Title: An Application Profile for Cataloguing Digital Learning Material Collections at Biblioteca Francisco Xavier Clavigero
Presenters: Alma B. Rivera Aguilera & Magaly Vega Lopez
Abstract: This poster reports a project which respond to the institutional needs of storage and preservation of teacher and student memories captured in digital learning material. Also propose a system for retrieval of digital learning material through adequate metadata and taking advantage of full text content. The main objective of the project is provide adequate storage, preservation and retrieval of digital learning material through appropriate metadata tags and pertinent digital collection software management selection. Some of the benefits are exposure, sharing and preservation of digital learning materials produced by the university community and the use of open software. The barriers founded were lack of regular practices about copyright issues and institutional policies. The most important result of the project is a system of storage and retrieval of digital learning material based in Greenstone with an application profile metadata based in Dublin Core, Learning Object Metadata and local labels. Besides, this experience permits the conceptualization of a model for developing application profiles for other digital collections. In the future we hope to design, develop and offer to the community a social network system to facilitate the description, social tagging and sharing of learning digital material which will improve the current system characteristics.


Poster Title: Creating Collection-Level Metadata: A TELDAP Case Study
Presenters: Ya-Chen Ho
Abstract: The Taiwan e-Learning and Digital Archives Program (TELDAP) has taken on the task of digitizing the nation’s important cultural artifacts, and has produced over 3,000,000 metadata records. However, as the amount of data increases, the retrieval and utilization of these resources tend to be all the more difficult for users, and managers also find it hard to assemble and control the entire mass of digital data. Thus, in order to overcome these problems, this study has created a set of collection-level metadata for Taiwan’s digital archives, seeking to explore new facets of knowledge organization, facilitating the searching of information for users and the administering of resources for collection managers.


Poster Title: Establishing a Multi-Thesauri-Scenario based on SKOS and Cross-Concordances
Presenters: Philipp Mayr, Benjamin Zapilko & York Sure
Abstract: This case study proposes a scenario with three topic-related thesauri, which have been connected with bilateral cross-concordances as part of a major terminology mapping initiative in the project KoMoHe. The thesauri have already been or will be converted to SKOS and in order to not omit the relevant crosswalks, the mapping properties of SKOS will be used for modeling them adequately. The participating thesauri in this approach are: (i) TheSoz (Thesaurus for the Social Sciences, GESIS) which has been converted to SKOS in a first experimental version, an update is underway which will be oriented on the introduced SKOS extensions of the EUROVOC thesaurus (Smedt, 2009) and will use SKOS-XL additionally, (ii) STW (Standard-Thesaurus for Economics, ZBW) which has also been published in SKOS format and (iii) IBLK-Thesaurus (SWP). Currently, the conversion of vocabularies to SKOS is an active research area, but there are still unsolved and relevant issues which could not be treated satisfyingly yet. Our approach focuses on the application of existing crosswalks to the SKOS mapping properties and the establishment of a linked data application based on those connected thesauri.